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Taurus Rough Idle

Question:

I have a 2003 Ford Taurus 3.0L V6 Engine, when I have my car in idle it runs rough and the RPM’s stay at 700, when I put it into drive it hesitates, if I put the a/c on the RPM’s vary between 300-700 and then stalls out. I had routine maintance done recently, (oil change, air filter replaced,and tires rotated).The backpressure sensor was replaced,less than a year ago I had a tune up done.

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Posted: 23rd August 2010  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: Engine

Jaguar Trouble Codes

Question: I have a 2002 jaguar s type, 4.0 L with the codes 705 and 125 coming up…what does this mean?

Answer:

P0125 – Insufficient Coolant Temperature for Closed Loop Fuel Control
P0705 – Transmission Range Sensor Circuit Malfunction (PRNDL Input)

These codes are generic OBDII codes from the following site…
http://www.carclinicmagazine.com/fault_code_library.html

I would guess from the first code your coolant sensor is shot, or the
wiring is bad to the sensor.  The second one related to the
transmission shifter location, which the sensor may be in the
transmission or the console where the shifter is.  I don’t have a
Jaguar manual handy to tell you specifics.  Alldata repair manuals are
an excellent source for this kind of specific info.
https://www.autoeducation.com/alldata.htm

Posted: 22nd March 2010  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: Drivetrain, Engine

Porsche Ignition Timing Question

Question:

I need the position of the rotor caps. I assumed they were indexed and did not note position upon removal twice. 1987 Porsche 928 S4 32v V8 (2) rotors on end of camshafts.

Answer:

I dont have a specific procedure for your vehicle, but its pretty
much the same for any car. You first need to bring the engine to TDC
(top dead center) TDC is when cylinder #1 is at the top of the
compression stroke and the spark plug is ready to fire. You can pull
the spark plug from cylinder one, feel for compression by placing your
finger over the spark plug hole and turn the engine until the timing
mark comes up to TDC. The timing mark should be close to the
crankshaft pulley and is usually cast into the front cover. If you
dont feel air escaping the spark plug hole, you are coming up to the
top of the exhaust stroke, rotate the engine another 360 degrees and
you should then feel the compression.

Once you know you are at TDC, you can align the rotor so that it
points towards cylinder #1s plug wire. As for the other rotor cap,
you would need your firing order to determine which other cylinder is
firing at TDC.

Check out the following site for some specific instructions…
http://jenniskens.livedsl.nl/Technical/Tips/Files/pirtle_tbelt.pdf

Posted: 18th October 2009  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: Engine

Honda Civic A/C Belt

Question:

Hi, I have a 1996 honda civic automatic 2dr coupe… my a/c belt on the engine is completely gone, and I have no idea where it went..anyways I want to fix it cheap, is this a do it yourselfer or a mechanics job? and how much would it cost?

 

Answer:

The belt should be no more than $30 and its not a difficult job that can be accomplished with basic mechanics tools. (socket wrenches etc.) I do not have specific instructions but you can check out https://www.autoeducation.com/alldata.htm for an online manual which will have step-by-step instructions. I would also check to make sure the A/C compressor is not frozen, as this could cause the belt to be thrown or broken.

Posted: 23rd July 2009  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: Engine, Heat & AC

Firing Order For Oldsmobile Engine.

Question:

What is the firing order for a 1953 olds 88 with a 303 CI Engine.

 

Answer:

I dont have a manual that goes back that far, but I know where you can get a factory service manual on CD…

http://www.classicjunkyard.com/store.htm

I did a quick search online, and could not find anything for that year either.

Posted: 20th July 2009  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: Engine

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