Ford Edge Ball Joint Replacement

ball joint, ford edge, control armSometimes it is the correct way to repair a ball joint by replacing the entire control arm. A previous repair to this Ford Edge that came in for an alignment failed by using a lower quality ball joint replacement. This particular control arm had issues with the ball joint socket stretching when the joint is replaced. This particular vehicle had the ball joints pop out of the control arm while driving. I know NAPA doesn’t even offer the ball joint separate from the entire control arm.

ball joint, ford edge, control armball joint, ford edge, control arm

disc brake, squeal, dust, pads
Mechanic’s Corner is brought to you by Denny Aungst of Jeck’s Service Center in Pine Grove, PA. Jeck’s Service Center is a multi-faceted family run business specializing in automotive, light truck and school bus repair. Denny is an ASE Master Certified Auto Technician and enjoys sharing tips on his website and Facebook page make sure to follow along on Facebook and if you are in his area, consider Jeck’s for your next service.




Posted: 16th January 2017  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: Mechanics Corner

Twisted Cartridge Oil Filter

disc brake, squeal, dust, padsThese style oil filters can be tricky. Make sure to get them on straight AND properly torque the housing. This customer came in with ZERO oil pressure due to the previous shop getting the filter installed crooked. It twisted it that tight and locked the bypass valve so no flow could eventually make it through the filter. This filter made it almost 9000 miles (well over due for change) and couldn’t have been very efficient at protecting his engine.

disc brake, squeal, dust, pads
Mechanic’s Corner is brought to you by Denny Aungst of Jeck’s Service Center in Pine Grove, PA. Jeck’s Service Center is a multi-faceted family run business specializing in automotive, light truck and school bus repair. Denny is an ASE Master Certified Auto Technician and enjoys sharing tips on his website and Facebook page make sure to follow along on Facebook and if you are in his area, consider Jeck’s for your next service.




Posted: 13th January 2017  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: Mechanics Corner

Critters in your engine’s air filter…

disc brake, squeal, dust, padsOne of the most neglected things on a car is the air filter. This one was a vehicle that is parked outside. Mice love to find warm places to make their nests. This then clogs the filter and skews the MAF readings on a modern car causing it to usually use more fuel and misfire. Check them regularly or better yet, if you live in a remote location or park them for extended times, you may want to use a screen over the intake duct to prevent the entry of mice.

disc brake, squeal, dust, pads
Mechanic’s Corner is brought to you by Denny Aungst of Jeck’s Service Center in Pine Grove, PA. Jeck’s Service Center is a multi-faceted family run business specializing in automotive, light truck and school bus repair. Denny is an ASE Master Certified Auto Technician and enjoys sharing tips on his website and Facebook page make sure to follow along on Facebook and if you are in his area, consider Jeck’s for your next service.




Posted: 11th January 2017  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: Mechanics Corner

Disc Brake Squeal on BMW 3 Series

disc brake, squeal, dust, padsQuestion: Just purchased used BMW 3 series…automatic…diesel…the brakes are consistently squealing upon braking (slowing down from about 20-25mph to 0) dealer said this is usual “brake dust” issue and brakes don’t need to be changed until another 10000 miles…any advise? Noise is embarrassing.

Answer: Yes, more than likely the brake squeal you hear is normal.  Brake dust and pad design can cause some brakes to squeal more than others.

On your next brake pad change, make sure the mechanic cleans everything well and applies an anti-squeal coating to the back of the pads. (see products below)  I use this on every brake job I do and rarely have issues with squeal.

There are wear pads on most modern brake pads which let you know it’s time to change the brake pads, but that is usually a louder noise.  If you think it might be the wear indicators, I would take it to another shop you trust and have them pull the wheels and inspect the pads.

 

Posted: 11th October 2016  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: General

Starter and Battery Issues

alternator battery starterQuestion:
My car suddenly would not start. It made a clicking noise when
I turned the ignition and the lights on dash/etc. came on when
I turned the key. I was able to jump start it easily, but it
wouldn’t hold a charge. I also cleaned the corrosion off the
battery and was able to start it…but then again, nothing.
I expected it was the battery and/or alternator. I took it
to a mechanic who insisted it was the starter and the battery/elec
system was getting a charge. He seemed like a decent guy.
But, then in the end…he replaced the starter and the battery.
Suddenly, he found a friend with a wrecked car and gave me that
starter for free…charging me 140 to install it and then the
battery cost/install. I am getting wildly different information
from people around me…some saying it would not be at all possible
to jump start that car if the starter were bad- yet others say it
could happen. Was he telling me the truth or have I just paid for
something that didn’t happen/not nec? Help?

Answer:
The clicking noise is the solenoid, which is usually part of the
starter. Over time the solenoid contact points will arc from the
current flowing through the connection and will not make a good
connection to turn on the starter. You hear a click, but the starter
does not turn over. Sometimes a jump start will provide just enough
of an extra boost to overcome that corrosion on the solenoid. It’s
possible that is what was going on in your case.

Regarding the battery, your mechanic more than likely put a volt meter
on the battery with the engine running, this would tell him if the
alternator was charging. He may also have done a load test on the
battery to determine health of battery. If your battery was over 3
years old, it was probably a good idea to replace it anyway.

With all that said, the friend with a wrecked car sounds shady, and
$140 for install of a starter sounds high to me, he was most likely
hiding the cost of the used started in there. Most cars should take
an hour or less to replace the starter, at a shop rate of $60 – $80/hr
with an independent shop. This scenario also makes me think he could
have been hiding the fact that he did not change anything (Did he show
you the new/old starter?) since he was putting in a used starter, it
would be hard to determine if it was actually replaced since both
would look used. Hope that makes sense, and don’t want to say for
sure that was his motivation, but it’s always possible.

Posted: 12th August 2016  |  Author: Kevin Schappell  |  Category: Electrical, Engine

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